Saturday, September 13, 2008

Yarn Giveaway!

I was asked to talk to a Permaculture design course last night about our farm, our mutually beneficial relationship with Felix Neck that allows us to graze our animals there, and our unique, alternative financing. 

I didn't really know anything about permaculture before I was invited to speak, and it's a mad interesting subject. I don't know enough to write about it here but follow the link to learn more. 

The man who spoke before me was talking about the importance of local food systems and I learned the most amazing thing. How much food do you think your local supermarkets have on hand in case of an emergency? A month? Three weeks? 

Three days. That's it. Three days worth of food.

Now, that's a scary thing no matter how you look at it, but when you live on an island, it's really disturbing. Think about it- in the event of an emergency (think 9/11) or a natural disaster (Katrina) that stopped the ferry from coming to the Island, we would be a-ok for exactly three days.

The point of this isn't to scare you into stocking your pantry with a year's worth of canned and dried food. The point is to scare you into getting to know your farmer. 

So I wanted to share that with you. I also want to share with you the $50 honorarium that I got for speaking last night. I tried to refuse it but the course leader pressed it into my hand and said "I'm buying $50 worth of yarn then and you can give it to whomever you want."

I want to give it to one of you. 

Here's the deal: The winner of this giveaway will receive two skeins of MVFF yarn in any of the colorways in my etsy shop.  All you have to do is leave a comment below with some way of identifying you should you win. Sadly, anonymous comments will have to be deleted.  I'll chose the winner on Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m.

While your here, read the post below about the bonobos apes and enter to win one of three children's books I'm giving away.

And next time you're at the Farmers Market, introduce yourself to some of the hardworking people that grow your food and say thanks. Get to know them. 

296 comments:

1 – 200 of 296   Newer›   Newest»
Sara in WI said...

I love my Farmer's Market. Unfortunately, there are no fiber people there.....yet....Thanks for the chance to win some of your lovely yarn.

Survivor on Rav.

lousli said...

Oooh, I have to leave a comment because I love Cormo, and I love your yarn! Thanks for your thoughts about locally grown food and the farmer's market.
Lesleyluu on Ravelry

fluffystuff said...

When I traveled in Europe, I noticed every home had some fruit trees or a garden. Here, (So.Cal) it is very rare. I have a garden patch and 25 fruit trees. I can, dehydrate and pickle. I have food in the freezer. I believe that I could probably last a couple of weeks if I could get water. But then you have to think about all the people who would break down the door at the smell of food cooking. Although I am prepared, I am just not looking forward to the disaster.

Linda D said...

Two skeins! Holy cow, here is how to identify me. I live in Dayton OH and have a large tattoo of my late dog on my arm.
I really loved that dog.
Linda

Paula said...

Ooh, I dream of wonderful yarn...CheekyKnits on Ravelry.
Thank you for being generous!

Samantha said...

Try reading Cormac McCarthy's "The Road" and see if you don't go running to stock your pantry. Hey, if Armageddon comes, at least I can knit myself some clothes!

quinn said...

What a nice honorarium! That's a quick-thinking course director :)

quinn on rav

Constance said...

The state of this world..

I would like to be entered into the giveaway.

constants on ravelry.

Susu:) said...

Bookmarking permaculture so I can learn more!!

We started using a local farm for our dairy. Very cool to meet the animals to see they are well taken care of and to get to know the farmer. Yay for local!

Sligo said...

thanks for another chance to win some great yarn! I was just thinking about the emergency food situation with regard to Houston over the next month. My husband and I are growing as much of our family's food as we can, and we try to buy the rest from local farmers and businesses. It's good planning and great food.
I'm sligo on Ravelry

Vaedri said...

Thanks for thinking of us. Count me in, please!

~ Vaedri, here and just about everywhere (including Ravelry)

Steph said...

I'm in SoCal (Hermosa Beach) and we've planted a bunch of fruit trees (trying the backyard orchard method though it's in our front yard, we have no backyard), a small plot for veggies on the south facing wall of the house, and earthboxes on our garage roof....I want to learn how to can etc. I'd have chickens if we could and had the space.

What we don't grow, we get at the Farmer's Market! I've chatted with the bison guy (even queried about fiber, but they're not doing anything like that yet).

I have pics on my blog
www.stephannietallent.com

shosh15 said...

I have to say that I think it is truly disturbing to think that the stores only keep enough food in them for 3 days....
I am really glad that we really don't have to go all that far to get food from farmers.

theShizzKnit said...

I love to work with bast fibers, wool, cotton, and spin, weave, sew. My friend's DH often jokes that he wants me on their team at the time of the apocalypse so we won't all be nekkid. We're in NYC and often talk about pooling our resources to buy a building for us all to live in with a plot of land in the back. Now next to take a permaculture course!

TheShizzKnit on Ravelry

DataGoddess said...

I talked to the vendors at my Farmers' Market today, as a matter of fact, and totally enjoyed discussing the weather, what's still growing, etc. Being close to the state ag school (Purdue) means there's a lot of cutting edge farming here, even organic :-)

Brat said...

This is another reason to love the CSA we joined this year. Between the local cow and pig my sister and I split once a year and the CSA we're almost 100% local at the table every night. I keep trying to explain to my husband that I'm not the only one with 12 kinds of flour in the pantry. He refuses to believe me.

bigevilgrape said...

I'd love some free yarn :)

Kate in CT

burrito said...

I love that local food and food security are becoming more main stream issues. I hadn't heard of either until a few years ago! Crazy.

Yay course leader for forcing you to do a giveaway!

MamaMay said...

Thank you! I am MamaMay on Ravelry.

Max said...

Boy, you can really see the truth of this any Saturday afternoon at Trader Joe's - nothin' left!

Anyway, nothing against TJ's - the farmers' markets don't have toilet paper! - but I find it so satisfying to go the markets and make relationships with the actual growers. Thanks for the reminder :)

--Max on Ravelry

goodkarma said...

I'm glad you and your farm are getting more and more interest and exposure, and I'm in agreement that our local farmers are absolutely invaluable in our society, even though we live in such a fast-food, plastic-wrapped world. I'm blessed to live in a city with several neighborhood farmers markets within easy reach throughout the week. Yay local!

GramKnitsMostlySocks said...

I would love to win your yarn! I love Cormo. It would be a pleasure to tell everybody about your yarn.
Laura S.

staceyjoy said...

heehee...of course I LOVE YOUR WOOL, and I HAVE to leave a comment, Susan! I will love it and take very good care of it, and actually make something for myself with it if I win! {fingers crossed} xxx, staceyjoy

Robin Steinbeck said...

I love this CSA. It is so much fun!
Robin from Ohio.

mydogpetey said...

Free yarn.
Did someone say, free yarn?

Me!
Me, me, me!!
{waves hands wildly in the air}

Pick me!

mydogpetey has had a bit too much sugar today.

elliephillipo said...

I love love love farmer's markets. We have two in my area, but my favorite is the one in West Tisbury ;-)

Ellie Phillipo

Perry said...

One of the reasons that I'm in your co-op is that you ARE one of my local farmers (albeit offshore from me a bit)!

I grow a veggie garden, organic, summers here, and support my local farmstands whose farmers grow locally.

Little steps we all can take can change the world--

from an aging hippie,

-Perry-
perrylowell@gmail.com

cgriff said...

Free Yarn!
Perhaps, should the need arise, I could knit for food! : )
Carmen

Laura said...

What a great message for a contest! - Laura

Sarah said...

The last time we tried to prepare for an emergency we bought 6 gallons of water and stored the box in our closet. It was the last we thought of it.. until we opened the closet to find water dripping... dripping... somehow the bottles had, most of them, buckled.. *grin* So goes emergency preparation in a small manhattan apartment.

ms. crafty said...

What a wonderful honorarium! So sweet!

Quirkles said...

You're always doing giveaways! You are so generous! Of course you know I would love any MVFF yarn I could get my hands on. I am inspired by all the local food discussions going on, and someday hope to have egg-laying chickens and a garden. Maybe when I retire?

Crista said...

That is scary business! Saratoga was without power for as much as a week in some sections during an ice storm in the dead of winter two years ago.

You stop taking things for granted when it drops down to 40 degrees the second night in the house.

A Crafty Lawyer said...

I've gotten some of your mohair locks, but I've never had the chance to touch any of your yarn. The colors always look so wonderful on etsy.

BTW, if you want to see what I did with those gorgeous mohair locks, look here: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3273/2600875832_9f848e5e9e_b.jpg

Ms. Nidoog said...

I'm spoiled -- the Hollywood Farmer's Market offers everything from bison, free range chicken and fresh caught fish to every vegetable imaginable. I've discovered all sorts of things -- like purple bell peppers. Yum!

Emily said...

My partner and my best "couple friend" went to permaculture school and is always coming out with stunners like that. Fascinating stuff.

Thanks for the chance to win!

Kathleen said...

I am very lucky to live in a place where there are lots of farms, a great farmer's market and the grocers sell local food. We even have a winter localvore CSA (lots of root veggies). This week the Localvore Group is challenging people to eat locally (spice globally)for an entire day, week or month to raise awareness and to support the local farmers. It definitely makes you think about where your food comes from and the people that grow it and raise it.
Local yarn is good too !

Demps on Rav

Mollie said...

I feel lucky to live in a place that has a great year round farmers market, unfortunately, I don't get there as much as I'd like to.

I'm molliebug on ravelery.

girlwithasword said...

I'm sitting down to read emails (and this blog) after spending $100 on local raspberries, then coming home and freezing most of them tp eat all winter, and spending 2 hours dehydrating tomatoes and zucchini from my local csa and making apple butter from a friend's apples. Local food is where it's at, and permaculture is wicked bitchin' cool. :)

Rebecca Gordon said...

Well, since I insisted on learning to spin yarn, I've promised to clothe my little household of four, come the long-expected San Francisco earthquake. (They, for their part, have offered up the fur of one tiny kitten, one cranky cat, and an elderly beagle.)

Seriously, I've often ruminated on how the specialization and industrialization of our amazing technological society leaves us vulnerable in the event of a real disaster. The skills of most inhabitants of the developed world are many steps away from what we need to satisfy basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter.

Do I want yarn? Of course!!

Joan said...

I buy my produce at the farmer's market or at the local coop in great part because of the personal contact that goes with the food (and the food is much better, a bonus). I joined MVFF CSA because of wonderful experiences with vegetable CSA's in years past. It has not disappointed, even with not having seen any produce yet - the anticipation is as good as the getting.

Heidi said...

Oh please, oh please pick me thy great and wonderful random number generator.

e.marie said...

I'd never heard the phrase permaculture before, but I'm glad you linked to it. I work at a college and each year they chose a "common reader," a book they encourage the entire campus. This year it's "Plenty" by Alisa Smith and J.B. McKinnon, who spent a year eating only food that was grown/produced within a 100-mile radius of where they live. Very interesting, and I'm looking forward to hearing them speak when they visit the college for a lecture later in the semester!

LaRue6358 said...

Free yarn! Fantastic. The difference between Good and Great is free!

I try to do as much food shopping as I can at farmers' markets. As yet I can't find any locals who do beef, lamb, chickens or eggs (and I live on Long Island, fairly populous). Only one market has fiber - my friend (said fiber farmer) was told by several farmers' markets that she could not get a booth because she didn't sell food! Does that mean she's not a farmer? Pretty silly.

Knit - R - Done said...

I love Cormo. Num num.

Such a lovely blog.

Anonymous said...

I love our farmer's market, and even more, the produce store down the street. it has had an off and on existence the past 35 years, but is thriving at tis point.

As I live alone, am a veggie only person, I shop rather often. I do try and keep things I've made in the freezer. Yes, with a catastrophe it could all need to be eaten quickly, but then, I could share it with the neighbors. Enough bottles of wine put away to accompany it.

I'm not meaning to joke, it's living in earthquake country and knowing it can be anytime. It's also about the shocky way we all get, a little wine and some soup seems helpful.

Identify myself? Okay Peggy McGurk, I think the e-mail address will come up. I haven't knit with your yarn yet, am waiting for Spring 2008 to arrive.

Keep up the good work. :) M

Karen said...

I love my farmer's market and my CSA guys, but it's been hard to find local fiber producers. My daughter did win a first place blue ribbon in the Ingeo fiber crochet category at the Iowa State Fair this summer, though!

Karen
6sqwooeywabbitz@gmail.com

Marty & Loretta said...

I would love to weave your yarn -
Loretta

SeDress said...

We don't have a 'farmer's market': just Bergman Farms, which has been in business for over 50 years, growing peaches and apples and veggies and selling them to locals and all the tourists who love to take a basket of peaches home to the 'big city'. Of course, the land for growing those peaches and apples is getting awfully expensive, as more and more of the area gets converted to condos and overpriced 'vacation' homes. But you prob'ly know all about that, living on the vineyard.

Lisa said...

Yarn? Me please!
I love the CSA I joined this year-I'm hating that it will end soon. Luckily, Farmer's Market will keep going until the end of October, so I will still get my fresh stuff!

Cynthia J. Kindler said...

I love going to our local farmer's market and I believe we have one of the best in St. Paul, MN It is an experience all in itself. We have most everything but no fiber as of yet. If there was, I would find it. Love your new colors and would love to knit with one of them. Put me in the give away, please.

Erin C-B said...

Hey there ShepherdSusie!

Like everyone else I'm responding to your free yarn post on Ravelry but I just wanted to say how awesome it is that everyone has to read through the post on permaculture - it's a really vital topic and I think people in the US especially need to think a lot more about food security and where our nibbles come from! So thank you so much for doing that. I'd like to know more about what a Fiber CSA does so I'll be reading up on that as well.

Thanks!
Erinamelia

margaret sandercock said...

I would love to win some of your blue yarn; I am not just a Ravelry person, though I am that too, but in fact I am one of your shareholders.

Donna said...

What an awesome thing to do with your honorarium :-)

djbowlin on ravelry

queenmamajen said...

Wow. Three days? That's scary. makes a mental note to stock up on non-perishables

queenmamajen on Rav.

Beverly said...

We in south Florida know the importance of a storm pantry. We've had hurricanes in the last few years that have left us (and the markets) without power for 8 days. Timely topic!

Lauren said...

We get a bi-weekly box of produce from a local farm and I love it! I get all sorts of things I'd never pick up at the farmer's market, and it's challenged me to cook new dishes - most of which have turned out well.

-lauren on ravelry

Anonymous said...

It would be treat to knit with some of your yarn.
Billie G
Los Gatos Calif

PaperYarnGirl said...

I love my farmer's market, though we have no fiber vendors, yet!

What a lovely idea, to give away yarn. Tomorrow's my birthday, and Wednesday was my 20th anniversary, o that would be a wonderful treat! :-)

PaperYarnGirl on Ravelry

jennifer said...

i would love some of your YARN! patiently waiting for my spring share. send me some please!
lucylou on ravelry

Jean said...

Homegrown food and homegrown yarn ... it doesn't get any better than that. I'm a spring and fall 2009 shareholder, or the ID should send you to my blog.

Kathleen Haymes said...

Wow! What a great idea. I love our local farmers market... one of these days I'll venture into a garden of my own, once I can tame my black thumb (seriously, I've killed ivy... not pretty).
I'd naturally love to win some yarn... come on random number generator - I've survived Ike and just got power back.
Kathleen Haymes... shareholder :-)

Nana Smith said...

Well, I am investigating different types of yarn and would love to try yours out. I live in the middle of the Mojave Desert (but it's really in the middle of nowhere!)

Elsie said...

Awesome idea! Thanks! I love my market and getting nervous about not having it for the winter months. Though it seems like some of the bigger vendors are finding outlets, which is good.

Judith said...

oooh, living with sheep on MV, life doesn't get much better than that! love cormo too! please add me to the giveaway - and thanks so much for sharing!
Judith
rav-sixineverycolor

PolarBearCreations said...

Whrn we lived in Canada we owned 10 acres . We had a big veggi garden, fruit trees, and berry bushes.We had lots of fresh fruits and veggies Our neighbor had cattle and elk and we got some meat from him for the freezer and smoked.I miss it all......
Here in Florida we go to a local fruit stand to buy veggies and fruit, but I havn't found any other sources yet.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the link and the reminder. This year we grew tomatoes, but not matter how we tried to protect the plants the birds made a mess of most of the fruit. It's annoying but if we had actually needed to live on the tomatoes we'd be out of luck. Luckily we have a number of really nice farmer's markets around the Austin area. Thank you for be so generous.

catznknitz on ravelry

peggyb said...

love our local farmer's markets and

also looking forward to receiving

yarn from your flock as a Fall '08

shareholder--would love to win an

early sample

cj said...

I grew up in New Orleans with access to fresh vegetation and road side stands at every turn. If we needed tomatoes we would drive past the grocery store, down the road to Becnel's stand and get whatever we needed there.
When I moved to Harlem, I thought we would have ready access to fresh vegetables as well. Little did I know it is darn near impossible. Thank goodness for the local CSA. We now have an abundance of fresh organic food every week as well as opportunities to work the farm 2 - 3 times a year. What a life they lead!
Christine

marina said...

I just went to our local farmer's market today--it's very small but lively. I don't try to grow any vegies because the gophers would grab them all, but I'm happy to buy from our local farmers.

I'm quiltnut on ravelry!

PleaseElise said...

Wow! I can't believe it's only three days. I used to go to the Farmer's Market weekly from March to November in the small town where I lived, but now I'm in the big city and there are none within walking distance. I'll try to make more of an effort to travel, though, lol.

Susan Berger said...

I love the hand dyed sock yarn and the other things I bought this summer! I would love the yarn give-away,
Susan Berger

Rebecca T said...

Boggles the minds doesn't it? All of that food, and only 3 days worth. One of my local grocers got cut off from shipments the day before Hanna. I went in during the storm and the shelves were bare.

I'll be finding my local farms ASAP!

Froux2zj on ravelry

CJ said...

I'm at my local Farmers Market every week for fresh produce, sadly no fibery folks at the local one, but that's why I have you!!

Eating locally grown foods makes for improved health too!!

Rebecca said...

I have been dying to try the eggplant!

Kate said...

Yeah for local grown food! If only everyone had local fiber...

marianne said...

I love your CSA model; I've been in several CSAs, including the very first one ever in Greenville, NC. And farmer's markets are probably my favorite places in the whole world. Thanks for the chance to win yarn!

Danielle said...

Thanks for the reminder to support our local farms!

Marlitharn said...

I dream of lovely yarn! Only store I have around here is Walmart. They may run out of food in 3 days, but there'll still be shelves full of Red Heart! I'm Marlitharn here and on Ravelry.

Maegan said...

Wow, 3 days... that's a lot less than I expected. My stock of canned goods that looked quite excessive before now looks pretty small. That's even more motivation to continue on with the experimental garden we tried this summer!

LaVerna said...

I adore the Farmers Market.My parents also grow a big garden every year so we have plenty of summer prduce.
How very generous giving away yarn!

Susan in Maryland said...

I recently met a fellow fiber lover at our local farmer's market. She was spinning and I noticed we have the same spinning wheel. We had a great conversation. Farmer's Markets--there not just for veggies! Thanks for the offer to share your yarn.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Susan for a great giveaway and a great topic on your blog.
jsample (on ravelry)

Amanda said...

Wow, I just looked at your etsy shop. The yarn is beautiful! I'd love free yarn. :D I'm stringcat on Ravelry.

Megan said...

I'm a big fan of farmer's markets and farm stands since I worked at one in college. Initially I was amazed at the quality of the produce - who knew carrots could taste like that. I'm showing my sons now how food that you work for all summer can be much more rewarding that just filling your belly.

I love me some yarn too!

Twizzler on Ravelry said...

I live in a large urban center. I always stock up on canned and dried goods. I could easily go a month on my pantry supplies.
Love your blog and etsy store. Thanks for another giveaway.

Lisabeth said...

I belong to a farmers group where once a week I share a crate full of vegetables with my friend. She is the creative one, ok and she can cook. I usually just follow her recipes! I have started to can my vegetables too, as well as flash freeze them with dry ice. I am anxious to see how they turn out next summer. This is the first summer we have done this and I will continue to do so for as long as I can! Thank you for all you do.
Creatrlvr on Ravelry.

julie said...

my comment seems to be lost...
great topic and great giveaway. thanks Susan

jsample (on ravelry)

Jenny in Missouri said...

We grew some tomatoes, basil, and eggplant this year, and my kids really enjoyed monitoring their progress and harvesting the results. Now if only we could grow some yarn too...

Jane said...

It WAS a rainy, dreary day, but there was knitting to do and conversations and wine, and in the end it was good.
The 3 days of food is a little scary - wow! What a strange world when that is so. Farmers forever!

Jane

Ed and Kelly said...

Your yarn is beautiful! It's always worth the gas money to get to a farmers market around here :)

KellyBrz on ravelry

jenibug said...

Wow 3 days? I don't know why I should be surprised since in the south the stores literally sell out of bread, milk and eggs whenever a snowflake is threatened. Forget about a whole snow storm!

But then I love the local farmers and get to the market whenever I can and love to support them.

Anonymous said...

I was about to comment on permaculture when I saw your previous post about Bonobos. My favorite website for 'entertainment' is
www.ted.com . I recently watched a talk by Jane Goodall about Bonobos and their disappearing habitat. Very sad. As for permaculture, my town has a very active community of permaculturalists, with a magazine called Permaculture Activist. All the best to you.
Diane/Bloomington,Indiana
dleirer@aol.com

Anonymous said...

I knew there was a reason I planted waaayyy too big of a garden this year! Three days is pretty scary.

nancytrun on Rav
and spring 09 shareholder (grow, wool, grow - yea wool!)

--Deb said...

The sad part is that we don't have a farmer's market that's closer than a 20-minute drive ... and I certainly don't garden, either!

Jenny Girl said...

The 3 day food thing is a bit scary. That's a bad visual.
It is so sweet of you to pay it forward.
I am JennyGirl on ravelry.
Thanks!

LisaD said...

It is hard to be self-sufficient but we grow lots of fruit and veg at our home. We buy from several local farms and there is even a local grainary/mill.
Now I need to learn to spin!
permaculture - interesting!
my nephew did not even know peas came in pods, blueberries from bushes.
Termiknitter2 on Rav
thanks for the opportunity

jeaniewh said...

Thanks for sharing your honorarium with fellow knitters.

I plan to go to the Farmer's Market tomorrow!

jeanie on Ravelry

Quality Chick said...

Agreed! We love our Farmer's Markets and our farm stands. Its much better to buy local when possible - and that is also why we like being a part of the MVFF CSA. skoswalt@mac.com aka quality chick

Elena said...

yummy yarn please!

JenLanger said...

My family and I are known by name at several of the farmers' market booths here in Portland, OR. It's a weekly event, and it takes something really extraordinary to get us to skip it. The food just tastes so much better, and I get a huge sense of satisfaction from knowing that the people working at these farms are respected and well-treated (not to mention that the animals are well cared for).

Valerie said...

Susan,

How gracious of you to pass along your honorarium! Interesting fact about grocerers stocking 3 days of inventory.

I try to shop at one or two of my local farmers' markets each week, although the season is short. I discovered heirloom tomatoes last year. They alone are worth the trip. I frequently bought produce and meat from two families. They work so hard it makes my heart ache for them. I enjoy sharing with my husband and son stories about the people I buy from - I especially hope my 18 year old son recognizes the efforts of others to provide healthy, delicous food for us.

I'm sure you have read Barbara Kingsolver's Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. Great book.

Valerie

thomrj said...

Love going to the Farmers Markert, wish we were closer to one. Very sweet of you to share your honorarium :)

Susan said...

Hey everybody, thanks for all the great comments. I am so happy to hear how many of you already know your neighborhood farmer!
BTW- please feel free to enter the Bonobos book giveaway in my previous post while you're here.
XO

anna dorothy said...

such a nice idea! thanks!!
annadorothy on ravelry

sarah said...

Yay, beautiful free yarn! You're so nice to share!

Ellen said...

Hi Susan,

Naturally curly Ellen here.aka EllenRonnie on Ravelry
Thanks for your generosity.

One of the best things about where I live is being near so many farms. Our farmer's market is fantastic, everything from great produce, artisan cheeses, soaps, breads, herbs, eggs and yarn in the winter.
One vendor is so cute, they have the names of the chicken who laid the eggs in every carton you buy.

It makes me feel great to support my local economy. And have the best, freshest food for my family.

Katom Burke said...

i'd happily take it off your hands :)
Kate

Julie said...

oooh!!

we didn't get to go to the farmers' market today because of the torrential rain...I always feel for the farmers on days like today. :( We do have markets 5 days out of 7 though...one of the great things about living in a big metro area!

Jenna S said...

Love our farmers and the market!
Happily our local grocery store stocks mostly local produce!
Cheers!

Jenna

Diane said...

Once again.......I'm leaving a comment with some way of identifying myself should I win. We have FOUR farmer's markets within about a 5 mile radius of my home. I do have one favorite, though.......

Phyl said...

I can be identified because I'm one of your shareholders!

anne said...

Thank you for sharing the yarn with us. I love shopping at the farmers market; it's one of the things that always makes me love living in New York!

Anonymous said...

Thanks for sharing, Susan! Now get back to writing!!!
Lori (Ravelry: Knittingfool)

helenlam said...

Interesting to think about. Thanks for the giveaway!

MsChris said...

I read your article with interest - if supermarkets only keep 3 days of food on hand, how come their produce looks so old??? Maybe its the time it takes to transport them. We have someone come to the office from the Farmers market - I buy free-range lamb and bison from him. We grow a little produce too.

Your yarn looks scrummy - I'm MsChris in Ravelry. (Fingers crossed!)

Elizabeth said...

In extreme weather you can survive...

3 hours without shelter
3 days without water
3 weeks without food.

That's a fair amount to think about as well.

Jenny said...

Hi Susan! Hay-ull yes I'm entering this giveaway! Yay for MVFF yarn!!!!

I read this to Ken, because I'm ALL about finding local farms here and his response was "pssh, there's way more than 3 days worth of food in a supermarket. I used to work in a supermarket." I was like, "where did you work?" "The A&P on the vineyard in high school." "And it wouldn't have been cleared out within 3 days in an emergency?" "... yeah, it would have."

He's funny. He makes me laugh. :)

Wool Enough said...

Greetings from another islander. Different island, different coast -- Catalina. This year for the first time ever we have had a weekly farmer's market. Nothing is grown on the island, so it's just one farmer from the mainland who brings his stuff over on the barge. I'm thrilled that he's willing to make the effort.

Amy S. said...

Hi, I've bought some MVFF Cormo and I can't resist the chance to win more! Love your fibers and the Vineyard farmer's market!

Amy (Amaryllis on Ravelry)

Susie said...

Three days supply of food on hand is both shocking and scary. For years I've always tried to have a pantry filled with simple things in case of an emergency. This year we grew a garden for the first time and are enjoying figuring out how to preserve some of our bounty.

Thank you for the chance to participate in your generous giveaway of lovely yarn!

Susie

Kenyetta said...

That is a scary thought! My farmer's market doesn't have any fiber!

Sarah said...

I missed going to my local farmer's market today, and I JUST moved to an island two weeks ago, so your comments seem especially relevant and real. Thanks for the very apt reminder!

- Sarah in Victoria

Eliza Ablovatski said...

Yes -- we just canned 21 cans of Lecso (Hungarian peppers and tomato sauce) for one every night all winter. I know the thought -- we need to be more self-sufficient.

I'd love to join the raffle for your yarn!

Thanks for the chance!
Yours,
Eliza JA
ej40@columbia.edu

Sner said...

This year was the first that I actually had space to put up food from the summer. It's been great and so satisfying. In Ottawa we are lucky to have some small farms near by and a great selection of fruits available within the province. Thank you for your generosity with your honorarium!
Heather

abeesley said...

We're lucky here in Denver to have several farmer's markets as well, although I haven't seen any fiber there. Lots of good fruit though!

cpullum said...

Need some yarn would love to win!!!
Carla
cpullum(at)yahoo(dot)com

caracolina said...

Thanks for another great thought-provoking yarn giveaway! My husband and I live in Phoenix, an area that usually is not associated with a lot of agriculture. However, we met a great guy who runs a tiny (less than 2 acre) all-natural farm about an hour from us in Tonopah, AZ (www.tonopahrob.com). All-natural means that while he's not "certified organic" his own standards are stricter than what the current organic standards allow (which have been ludicrously watered down to allow big business to join the industry). He uses no chemicals and instead relies on beneficial bugs and minerals to keep plants healthy and pests at bay. My hubby has been volunteering on this farm from Spring this year on until Summer which, due to the heat, is a break in our growing season, kind of like Winter is everywhere else. The amount of hard work that is needed to put healthy food on our tables is staggering! People are not appreciative of it, I believe. They also don't realize that a locally harvested fruit or vegetable tastes so much better than the stuff that has been stored and trucked to your supermarket. Thanks to DH's hard work we received a nice share of the harvest and were able to can, dry, and freeze pound after pound of tomatoes, egg plant, figs, garlic, zucchini, summer, and winter squash, all of which are intensely flavorful. Yay, local foods!

miss ewe said...

Did you eat today??? Thank a farmer... It really is amazing, how precarious our food supply is.

HODGEPODGESPV said...

wahooo we just got farmers market...but in coppell, texas, we were getting rain out from ike so, my wheelchair and i stayed inside with my spooked dogs. but local farmers and local shops are grrrrrrreat!

your puddle duck

ps, your bag is great at the grocery store when dh forgets some fabric bags to put produce in!

katygirl said...

Wow, what an eye-opening fact. I'll be thinking about that from now until Weds when I hit the farmers market...

Having just received my first order of your yarn, I would dearly love to win some more! I got the "blueberry pie" colorway, and I want to wear it and eat it simultaneously!

I'm skiffstreet on ravelry, by the way.

JSchwa said...

Mom bought my sister & I a knitting video, but I'm not impatient. I would love to try again, so this would be great!

Meg said...

the three day info, is super scary. I think I might throw a few canned goods in my grocery cart this week. Interesting topic though. That bonobos book is great.

Cupcake said...

I couldn't agree with you more knowing your farmers and the season in which food is grown is the best thing for everyone.

Thanks for bringing this to the attention of others.

I'm CraftyCupcake on Ravelry.

Julie said...

I've made my own little veggie bags out of tulle so most of the vendors I shop regularly at the Farmer's market recognize me pretty readily. And as for 3 days, I'm wondering if the food at the store would last even that long. When there's a storm coming everyone goes out to stock up on water and canned goods and the shelves are emptied pretty quickly.

Julie in MA

Estella said...

I'd love some of your yarn! I'm off to check out your etsy shop.

Raymie said...

I'm lucky enough to live next to a very well organized farmers market. A great place to shop.

Carolee said...

Living in Lancaster County, PA (or what the tourists call "Amish Country") we're fortunate in that you can't throw a rock around here without hitting a farm or farmstand - several CSA's too. In season, we wouldn't dream of buying produce from the supermarket, and we freeze a fair amount for the winter too. I just finished freezing 10 quarts of sweet corn. We also grow our own tomatoes, peppers and herbs. Local is the only way to go!

Thanks for offering the giveaway! I'm reachable via my blog/email. :)

~ Carolee

Bonney said...

I love my farmer's market. It's small but full of great stuff - especially the eggs!! Love this contest!

farmer sue said...

loving to see how many people your life has touched. The three day thought is scary... and on top of that... those eggs you get could be 30+ days old - not that you would care at that point!

another good book is The Omnivore's Dilemma by michael pollan - voted one of the 10 best by new york times book review.

a little bit of a hard read for me - but very good - makes you THINK AND THINK.

thank you for all the good things you are doing

hugs from your friend in/outside atlanta
farmer sue

Christine said...

What a lovely idea, and thanks so much! Here is my comment. I routinely visit my Farmers Market, and am just starting a relationship with a local (near Pittsburgh) farm that makes area deliveries (Not a CSA although I have done that too) I am looking forward to tasting their raw milk, cheese, fresh organic chickens/ham/lamb. Take care all.....Christine

Romelda said...

3 days is a shocker!! In addition to local markets there will be a vegetable garden in our future!

michelle said...

I love my local farmer's market. We have one fiber person who attends on any sort of regular basis. The farmer's market near my parents has several fiber people ~ one with yummmy local alpaca. (ravname ~ sigh)

Nadine Buck said...

How nice of you! I've been trying to make time to come and see you, I live in Chatham. But you know how it is with the Cape and Islands, you don't travel to much farther than your bordering towns!

yarnfrog42 on Ravelry

June said...

Our local farmer's market doesn't have fiber, but their fruits and veggies are fantastic. I appreciate their hard work and don't know what I would do without them.

Thank you for the opportunity for a chance to win your yarn.

thehook on Ravelry

Hockey Mom said...

I'd love to be entered into your giveaway. I agree knowing your local farmers is very important. We been buying from our CSA for over a month now and I've loved it!

Katie O said...

Wow... 3 days is scary! yikes! To add to another post, this is what I have always been told:

3 minutes without Air,
3 days without water,
3 weeks without food... is all the longer you can survive... the rule of 3's... kinda scary! :)

What a great thing to go speak and learn stuff! I love that!

Sleepy Pumpkin said...

Thanks for the chance to win some of your lovely yarn-- and the reminder to visit with a local farmer.

Catherine / autumnshades on ravelry

Colby said...

We have a small garden every summer and fall but now I'm thinking I should look into expanding it year round.

I'd love to play with some of your yarn.

Coldbee on Ravelry

Kristen said...

I love my farmer's market. I meet some girlfriends and we wander up and down all the rows and chat with the vendors and see new veggies that I've never seen before.

Jessica said...

I'm a relatively new transplant to Port Townsend WA. One of the many things that I about this community is its intense dedication to local products. I belong to a CSA and just joined in for the winter (who knew that would be possible!)
And as so many flock to our two farmers markets per week, more and more people are getting rid of their front lawns and growning vegetable gardens. I can't begin to count all the fruit trees in town - not to mention the wild blackberries. We've got local organic dairies, eggs, chicken and fish.
I used to love going to the farmers market when I lived in Los Angeles. The Santa Monica one was particularly great. But, now I realize that those "local" farmers were driving in from hundreds of miles away in man cases. That doesn't sound all that local to me anymore.

I love that you're offering another version of the CSA and wish you lots of success. (I see a movie in your future...)

KJo said...

50 dollars? Give the yarn to whomever you want? Not bad and you, giving us all a chance to be your choice recipient, is very nice! Thanks for having a giveaway!

KJo
(On Ravelry)

Lynn said...

Between the three day supply and the food prices themselves, I've tried growing a garden in the back. Unfortunately I have a BLACK thumb and I can't get much to grow, but I get closer every time I try. One day I'll have a tomato I can actually eat.

Thanks for the contest!
Lyntintin on Ravelry

smplfied said...

My daughter sent me to your site last year, since I joined a CSA here in NC. We are blessed to live in Raleigh, where the state farmer's market is.Best of both worlds - what doesn't come in my CSA box, I pick up at the farmer's market.

Fanamama said...

I 'm commenting because I lost my project! a sweater for my DD that only needs a front and it would be finished...but I can't find it anywhere! Talk about FRUSTRATION! Anyways....pick up RNG!
Hugs, Lisa in Buffalo

woolies said...

I recently discovered a local (teeny tiny) farmer's market - like your farm, they do CSA shares. My summer has been so insane, I haven't had a chance to look into this more, so thanks for reminding me to do so!
Back east, we had a HUGE veggie garden. It's much more of a challenge here in the southwest, and we didn't even grow tomatoes this summer. :0(
thanks for the chance to win - I really want that Quansoo beach color!!

Chiendeterre on Ravelry said...

I try to get to a Farmer's Market as much as possible - the ones near home are on weekdays and I work during the week. I just may have to move...or change jobs!

I do need more MVFF yarn - Who doesn't!?!

Nancy said...

We have a small garden and are now trying our hand at hydroponic gardening. See you at fall shearing.
Nancy of New York, or Mattsmom on Raverly.

Zoe said...

What a fantastic opportunity! Aside from the fiber CSA, my husband and I belong to a veggie CSA and a meat CSA from our local farmers. Buying local (and organic) is good for us, good for the environment and good for the local economy!

Jean said...

It's scary to do public speaking - good for you for doing it. Thanks for the yarn give-away contest.

JeaninMaine on Ravelry

benne said...

Very interesting post and a philosophy I agree with. I grew up on a farm, we have a garden and buy as much produce as possible from local farmers and consider ourselves stewards of the land we occupy.

It's good to "see" you again. I'm feathersong on ravelry. Thanks for the generous contest. :)

jinny said...

Oooh, pretty yarn! :)

Turtle said...

Even though we have a good sized garden our harverst a later than the people at the farmers market, and we are lucky to have a great farmers market right near the ferry!(my commute, works out great) I know most of the vendors there by first name.
I know what you mean though about the scariness of the food supply in case of an emergency. When we lived in the islands the stores would be wiped out (lol, batteries, TP, rice and spam) at the first mention of a storm, or dockers strike! I keep a well stocked pantry now just because of that reason.
That was sweet of the man to do that!

Rebecca Blood said...

I dream some day of having my own home and a plot of land large enough to raise part of our food. (I do what I can right now with a plot in our community garden and a membership to a CSA.) I don't worry too much about feeding us for a few weeks in an emergency - as a primarily vegetarian household, I have enough dried beans and grains on hand to feed us for at least a month.

I just love eating with the seasons - when tomatoes are done, they're done, but there will be more next year....

Katie said...

I'd love some "free" yarn. I have to say, since I joined your CSA for Spring 2009, I've been checking your blog frequently. I love hearing about how you are managing your farm, especially the idea of a yarn CSA. We already are in a fruits and veggies CSA and frequently debate joining a meat CSA, but realize we don't eat that much meat.

If I was lucky enough to win your giveaway, I would
(1) definitely get to experience your yarn before this time next year, and
(2) get two matching skeins of yarn to make my two bridesmaids a nice wrap each, to go with their dresses.

M.Soong said...

Addicted to your yarn! Thank you for being so generous and passing along the good karma.
-Melissa Soong

Katharine Martinez said...

Did you say free MVFF yarn!?! Please, please let this be my lucky day! I love your blog and your photos, and had the best time seeing your flock and you and your family last spring during the first MVWool Fest. I'm hoping to come over on the 27th. The local weekend farmers' market in Natick is small but great. No fiber farm booths - yet! There's also a weekly farmers' market on my campus that I love, and we just found a nearby farm that sells free range eggs. When I retire I would love to have a flock. Have you read The Good, Good Pig? You'd love it. Thank you so much for sharing your life with us!

Suellan said...

I'm loving getting to know more about the farm & sharing it all with the kids in my class as we explore the world around us and learn to live simply. This year we are learning about where things come from, that they aren't just bought/sold but made and we will learn to spin fiber into yarn, yarn that the older students will weave on a loom donated to the school!

~Suellan Birchard

ikkinlala said...

I grew up on a small farm, and one of the scariest things about moving to university was giving up that control over my food supply. I love the farmers' market here, but it doesn't continue over the winter, so I have a tendency to stockpile.

Ian Small said...

The best thing about our new house is that - smack in the middle of Silicon Valley - there is a farmer's market 5 blocks from us that operates twice a week. Which means we need to get about 3 days of food from it each time we go. Strange coincidence, that. -- ian

Lindsay said...

Thanks for giving me something to think about, Susan!

:-) Lindsay
(vtknitwit on Ravelry)

Anonymous said...

Kay in Wisconsin
Thanks for the offer--I hadn't heard of permaculture before, but it is an important concept. Keep up the good work!

Radknit on Ravelry

Gen said...

Yes Please!

The Happy Homeschooler said...

That is so scary! (the three day thing) But, I can believe it. We are in Texas and though we didn't see much from Ike, our store shelves are BARE! Luckily I am learning to can from a friend so we would at least have pickles and tomoto sauce :)

Please enter me in the drawing! Thanks so much!
Shelley

themamajama said...

Again you impress us with your generosity. Thank you for providing a place to provide some concrete thoughts to some wishful dreams.
Rena aka Glassneedle

Leesy said...

Lovely blog. We support local agriculture and we're not living on an island. Still, I can't imagine what would happen if we all were dependent on "big" agriculture!

nplumcreek said...

Please enter my name in the drawing! I am a Spring 2008 shareholder and can't wait to receive our share!!! Since retiring two years ago, we have made an effort to increase our consumption of organic and locally grown products including elk!! Better flavor and better for us!

Shirra said...

I'm in as always! I will win one of these days!

Jordan said...

I'm also on an island, although bigger than yours, in a part of the world where the authors of the 100 Mile Diet were able to successfully live for a year on food only produced locally. Now we wonder whether it's possible to have a 100 Mile Fibre Diet-I don't know many local producers, but I do love the idea of your CSA.

You can find me on Rav as Florapie :)

MJ said...

In my little urban neighborhood we have a neighbor-to-neighbor market to share our garden produce, and a front-porch pickup every other Friday for eggs, meat, produce and natural cleaning supplies from local producers. We are doing what we can.

Becky said...

Susan, this is quite a scary thought, considering the long cold winters in Ohio. I have been going to our local Farmer's Market all summer, doing my small part to support local agriculture. But it is soon to come to a close. And on another thought...I'm still waiting for my boxes from the USPS. Ordered them 13 days ago. I am wondering if you are having any better luck than me in getting them.

Best to you.
Becky Myers
limin1@zoominternet.net

Michelle Pierce said...

I'm a first time buyer at MVFF with my 2008 fall share. I have to agree with everyone. I too love supporting our local farmers by attending farmers markets and buying local goods at stores. I've also been trying to grow some stuff on my own. Right now the only things that seem to grow in my boyfriends backyard are tomatoes and poblano peppers.

Lenore Durell said...

Hi there!
Love our local farmers market. Now I'm jealous though, because we have no fiber at our market. We grow our own fruit and vegatables in our garden in hopes of being somewhat self sufficient. Our community is very a very small, farming area in rural Montana.
I sure hope I win! Thanks for the great giveaways.
L Durell

Woolly Stuff said...

we dream of having our own little back garden, and what you're saying about supermarkets just makes me want to make that dream become a reality even more...

woollystuff on ravelry

cthulhulovesme said...

Heya. I saw your post over on Ravelry, so I decided to stop by.

-cthulhulovesme

katerina said...

Ah, I dream of the day our farmers market has fiber! but thanks for the idea - and the information!
you can reach me on ravelry as yarnkat or by my blog.

Thanks!

elephant7 said...

Going to drop by the local farmers market tomorrow for apples to make pie with. Girls love it. Thanks for the chance to win your "earnings" ;-).

Knifty Knitter said...

Thanks for sharing you yarn love with us! You can reach me on Ravelry as thekniftyknitter or by leaving a comment on my blog.

Adrianna said...

that course leader is pretty clever ;)

this is such an important issue - i wish it got picked up more in the 'mainstream' media. thanks for blogging on it!

Adrianna (allegria13 on ravelry)

|chee-uh| said...

Shares! I'm going to try and convince the bf that we should by a share. This way I get yarn, fiber and an excuse to travel.

|chee-uh| said...

oops...I'm monkalicious on rav

Snicklefritz said...

I would love to knit up a winter hat with the Cormo yarn!!

Anonymous said...

Three days worth of food is a real eye-opener!

According to my husband if we could eat yarn we could feed the masses from my stash! He's a dear man but does stretch it a little bit - okay maybe not.

I'd love to win some of your yarn!

Sandy
Pecsan114@optonline.net

Writer Bug said...

I, too, love my farmers market! Unfortunately, I don't know that the farmer knows me well enough to share food with me in a case of emergency. I'll have to get on that! :) Thanks for the chance to win yarn!

KnitChickKim said...

I keep hoping to win some of that fabulous yarn. ~:o) I bought a share of the Fall Shearing last year and recently bought a share of the Spring 2009 Shearing. I can't wait.

KnitChickKim on ravelry.

Rue said...

oooo! Ooooo! Pick me! I joined up for spring shearing 2009...so no yarn for me til NEXT year! and I've been mad with jealousy over all the Yarn Is Coming!!!! announcements.
---Rue Ambiknitrix on Ravelry

blueberryblues said...

Yikes! Only 3 days worth of food. And that covers how many people?

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that I might win this one so that I can play with the yarn prior to receiving my Spring 2009 share (oh random number selector, please be my friend).

blueberryblues on Ravelry

wierkat said...

Every time my father comes to visit he starts talking disaster preparation. Three days worth of food in the markets? Maybe I'll start listening to him. ;)

wierkat

trh said...

I've always preferred local (and organic if possible) so love the farmer's market. Didn't know about the three days - that's more than a little frightening.

Christine G. said...

Another Spring 2009 shareholder who can't wait!

«Oldest ‹Older   1 – 200 of 296   Newer› Newest»